Child Passenger Safety

50 Years Later: The Rear-facing Child Seat

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the rear-facing child safety seat, a pivotal innovation in the field of child occupant protection. While there have been impressive strides made in child passenger safety in the US and abroad over the past few decades, there is still work to be done to ensure all children are optimally protected in motor vehicle crashes.

Teens and Distracted Walking

Our team came across this great infographic from Safe Kids about pedestrian safety -- “How Does a Teenager Cross the Road?”. Based on over 34,000 observations and discussion groups with more than 2,400 students during the 2012-2013 school year, their research indicates that a significant number of high school and middle school students cross the street while distracted, most frequently texting or using headphones. Although older teens account for half of all pedestrian deaths among children age 19 or younger, only one-fifth of teens felt that their age group was the most at risk for pedestrian injuries. To understand these findings, it is helpful to review brain development during adolescence and how teens make decisions.

Updated CPS Police Tip Cards

In time for Child Passenger Safety Week, the Child Restraint Basics Tip Card has been updated to reflect current AAP recommendations. This pocket-sized tip card has just the basics about CPS-- with room for you to customize it with your state's traffic code.

Airplane Safety Restraint for Kids with Special Needs

What if my patient doesn't need an adaptive car seat but has behavioral challenges and the parents feel that the traditional airplane seat belt may not be effective enough to keep him restrained? The CARES restraint is approved for airplane use for children 22-40 lbs and up 40 inches tall. If a child exceeds the weight limit but the parents feel that this is still a better option for restraint, they can apply for an exemption from the FAA.

Intersection Redesigned With Pedestrians in Mind: West Philadelphia

Guest Post from Gina Duchossois, MS, CHOP's Injury Prevention Supervisor, describes collaborative grassroots effort to redesign an intersection to reduce pedestrian injuries.

Children in Hot Cars: No Single Solution to These Preventable Tragedies

This blog explores how a multi-faceted approach is needed to reduce the prevalence of pediatric heat stroke. A combination of education, awareness, and technology can help families avoid these preventable tragedies.

The Evolving Science of Crash Data Collection

Many of our readers involved in traffic safety research are aware that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is moving forward with the modernization of the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) for the first time since NASS’s inception over 40 years ago. CIRP@CHOP has (and will continue to) partner with NHTSA to ensure that the unique safety needs of children are considered as NASS is updated.

New Resource Alert: Redesigned Child Passenger Safety Charts

Today, CIRP@CHOP has made available redesigned child passenger safety charts that provide valuable insight for child passenger safety (CPS) technicians, educators, researchers, and policymakers. Based on data collected through CHOP’s Partners for Child Passenger Safety (PCPS) study, the charts have been graphically updated for use in presentations and other educational settings. Each is available in both PDF and PowerPoint format for easy use.

Drowsy Driving: The Impairment That Can Impact Anyone

Media attention, research dollars, and awareness campaigns often target distracted driving and drunk driving as serious impairments that can impact drivers of any age. Another type of driving impairment that receives less attention, but whose prevalence and consequences are also significant, has suddenly been thrust into the national spotlight through a recent crash involving actor Tracy Morgan. That impairment is drowsy driving.

A Lesson in Royal Car Seat Safety: Part 2

Nine months ago, we blogged about the improper restraint methods used to transport a newborn Prince George of the UK home from the hospital. Unfortunately, the Royal Family is once again making international news for their concerning child passenger safety practices.

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