August 2014

Intersection Redesigned With Pedestrians in Mind: West Philadelphia

Guest Post from Gina Duchossois, MS, CHOP's Injury Prevention Supervisor, describes collaborative grassroots effort to redesign an intersection to reduce pedestrian injuries.

Using Best Practices to Design Public Health Interventions

Public health interventions should integrate best practices in program development.

Reach Diverse Populations Across GDL Continuum: How to Connect Researchers, Stakeholders, and Programs?

How can we better connect to improve road traffic safety with a focus on how teens learn to drive? Researchers and traffic safety practitioners all want youth to grow to their full potential. Doing so will require joining proven effective skill-building and risk-reduction interventions across the Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) continuum and making them broadly accessible through programs for diverse populations.

Airplane Safety Restraint for Kids with Special Needs

What if my patient doesn't need an adaptive car seat but has behavioral challenges and the parents feel that the traditional airplane seat belt may not be effective enough to keep him restrained? The CARES restraint is approved for airplane use for children 22-40 lbs and up 40 inches tall. If a child exceeds the weight limit but the parents feel that this is still a better option for restraint, they can apply for an exemption from the FAA.

Study of Top Five Teen Driver Crash Scenarios

How and why do teen drivers crash? This is such an important question for teens and parents, as well as researchers, automakers, and other road users, including other vehicles, bicyclists, and pedestrians. By better understanding teen driver crashes, we can design effective strategies to prevent them. Dr. Allison Curry and I co-led a study on teen driver serious crashes and our findings, recently published in Accident Analysis and Prevention, detail the scenarios in which teen drivers most often crash and compared them to adult drivers.

Shedding Light on Aggression and Urban Youth

Aggressive behavior is a common issue facing today’s youth. Although urban minority youth are at high risk for exposure to aggression and violence, many aggressive intervention programs are designed with (and for) suburban non-ethnic minority youth. In a recent study published in Development and Psychopathology, my colleagues and I examined several areas that have largely been understudied in the context of African-American adolescents within urban community settings. Specifically, our aim was to better understand the factors associated with aggression and violence for these at-risk youth.