April 2014

Why Preventing Pediatric Injury Death Is Only Part of the Puzzle

In a letter published today in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health, I commend the work being done by my pediatric injury prevention research colleagues in New Zealand to help reduce child injury mortality in their country. They developed injury prevention recommendations that were published late last year in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Public Health using a well-developed European Child Safety Report Card model as a metric for comparison. However, I believe that it is important to further adapt these Report Card metrics and also measure reduction in non-fatal morbidity from injuries in children.

Nations Can Agree on Road Safety

Today we welcome guest blogger T. Bella Dinh-Zarr, PhD, MPH, the U.S. Director of the FIA Foundation, to discuss the upcoming United Nations General Assembly debate about Road Safety, taking place on April 10.

An Additional Rating System for Infant Child Seats

Today, Consumer Reports released new infant seat ratings from its latest test protocol based on crash testing, ease-of-use, and fit-to-vehicle. After testing 34 commercially available infant seats, the consumer advocates group classified five seats as “basic,” 16 as “better,” and 13 as “best.”

The Child Passenger Safety Technician community should be prepared to field questions from consumer parents who wonder how they should interpret these results. Is their “basic” rated child seat is still safe to use? Here are few points to consider:

Considering LATCH Improvements

Today, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) released a new study in its latest Status Report regarding LATCH ease-of-use. Although child restraint systems (CRS) installed with LATCH or with a vehicle seat belt are equally safe, LATCH was mandated in motor vehicles beginning with model year 2003 in order to make CRS installation easier. However, research has shown that parents can struggle to correctly install a CRS using LATCH.

Toward A Better Understanding of Teen Driver Crashes

In an editorial published today in JAMA Pediatrics, I commend the work being done by my teen driver safety colleagues at Virginia Tech as part of the Naturalistic Teen Driving Study. The study by Ouimet et al.¹ examines the association between cortisol reactivity and crashes and near-crashes among newly-licensed teens. While these findings do present an interesting new line of research, they do not suggest that we are close to developing a clinically useful biomarker-based diagnostic test nor a pharmaceutical therapy to reduce the risk for teen driver crashes. Continued research is needed.

A Lesson in Royal Car Seat Safety: Part 2

Nine months ago, we blogged about the improper restraint methods used to transport a newborn Prince George of the UK home from the hospital. Unfortunately, the Royal Family is once again making international news for their concerning child passenger safety practices.

Inter-agency Model for Israel’s Child Safety Action Plan

Today, we are please to welcome a guest post from Esti Golan, manager of the Israel Child Safety National Action Plan, who shares with us some insight into the planning of this groundbreaking initiative in Israel.

For Healthcare Providers, Healing Doesn’t End With the Patient

Traumatic stress in healthcare providers may seem like "part of the job," but it can have a profound impact on their professional and personal lives. This post provides actionable steps for healthcare providers to manage their own traumatic stress reactions in the clinical setting.

Perspectives from a “We Love Our Youth Town Hall”

Today’s youth have to deal with issues related to violence (physical and verbal) daily. So, what do youth need to overcome these challenges? How can youth allow their strengths to shine through? At a recent Town Hall on Youth Violence in Philadelphia, a panel of four youth shared their collective wisdom.

DriveLab: A New Tool for Driving Simulator Research

Driving simulators offer a safe, highly reproducible environment for assessing driver behavior. However, reducing the data to easy-to-interpret metrics can be extremely time-consuming and effortful. Even worse, it can be error-prone. My recent research involves the development of a tool to help standardize driving simulator results called DriveLab.