March 2014

Using Digital Health Research to Overcome Health Disparities

Many of us care deeply about health disparities and are exploring new ways to reach the more vulnerable groups. These disparities include differences in incidence (new cases), prevalence (all existing cases), death (mortality), survivorship, and overall burden of health conditions that exist among specific population groups. They are found among different racial/ethnic groups and in certain communities and underserved groups, such as rural areas and older people. Why do these health disparities exist? The reasons are complex due to many factors, as Linda Fleisher, PhD, MPH, who leads the Digital Health Initiative at the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at CHOP, explains.

Contributing to the Digital Health Revolution

Read a guest blog post from Darshan Donthi, a sophomore at Drexel University, who shares his insights about about his time as a Drexel co-op student at CIRP@CHOP.

Try One Kind Word

All of us have been there. You are in a hospital reception area, riding public transit, or some other public gathering space. You see a parent telling a young child they are stupid or to shut up or is yanking their arm forcefully. It’s not rising to the level of “child abuse” for reporting purposes, but in your heart you know that those small, daily acts of violence can add up and have a real impact on that child’s development and well-being. You want to intervene for that child but you don’t know how or what would be helpful. Read how one kind word or gesture could help defuse the situation.

New Symposium: Utilizing Web-Based Programs to Promote Child Health

For those attending the Society of Pediatric Psychology Annual Conference in Philadelphia at the end of March, please take note of a symposium being held from 1:40 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 29th featuring members of CIRP's Post-injury Care and Recovery (PICAR) team. Come and join in the discussion, "Utilizing Web-based Programs to Promote Child Health: Primary Prevention, Secondary Prevention, and Treatment," with Meghan Marsac, PhD, and Nancy Kassam Adams, PhD.

Assessing Acute Stress Symptoms in Children Bilingually

Learn about a new study that assessed the acute stress symptoms of 500 children in three US cities in both English and Spanish. This study contributes to a growing body of research that is helping to develop validated assessment measures in Spanish to help clinicians care for Latino children in the US.

Questioning the Who, What and How of Digital Health Regulation

The digital health world is buzzing with recent news about a proposed bill to reduce U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation on “low risk” mobile medical technologies, such as health apps for smartphones that provide health education, management and prevention tools for practitioners and patients. The bill, Preventing Regulatory Overreach to Enhance Care Technology (PROTECT) Act of 2014, aims to amend FDA regulatory guidance on mobile health technologies that are of “low risk” to patient safety. Here's what you should know about the bill.

In Bullying Prevention, Singling Out the Victim Isn’t the Answer

Learn how employing a whole-school approach to bullying prevention, rather than singling out the bully or the victim, can lead to a culture of acceptance and empowerment.

Use of Analytics Essential to Web-based Outreach

Read a guest blog post from Tyler Chance, a junior at Drexel University, who shares his insights about about his time as a Drexel co-op student at CIRP@CHOP.

Why the Focus Should Be on “Engaged Driving” for Teens

While working with other auto safety researchers over the past year as part of a distracted driving panel organized by the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine (AAAM) and State Farm®, I have been introduced to the term “engaged driving” and prefer it to the term “distracted driving.” I think it better describes what we want drivers to do to be safe.