October 2013

Where to Start for Teen Drivers? With Parents

At CIRP@CHOP, we explore the behavioral aspects of strengthening this bond between parents and teens. From teens, we frequently hear that they take cues from their parents for what is appropriate driving behavior. Likewise, parents express concerns about not knowing where to start to help their teens become safe skilled drivers. In support of the theme for National Teen Driver Safety Week (October 20-26) -- It Takes Two: Shared Expectations for Teens and Parents for Driving -- I want to share practical tips for parents on modeling safe driving behaviors as a place to start to help their teens:

The Biomechanics Behind Child Passenger Safety

If you are a Research in Action reader in the field of child passenger safety, you know the safest ways to properly restrain a child in a motor vehicle and may even work to educate parents on this topic. What may be less obvious, however, is the complex body of biomechanical engineering research behind the current best practice recommendations.

National Teen Driver Safety Week – 11 Days & Counting

I belong to an important network of educators, community leaders, parents, teens, and organizations, both large and small. Our mission? To reduce teen driver crashes, the #1 cause of death for this age group. We are now gearing up for National Teen Driver Safety Week -- now in its 7th year and only 11 days away – and the momentum is building.

Manage the Driving Transition from Supervised Learner to Independent Learner

When teens pass the behind-the-wheel driving test some may incorrectly believe they’re equally skilled as other “licensed” drivers. This makes it difficult for teens to understand why certain activities are restricted during the early months of licensure. Consider framing the intermediate period of GDL as a learner permit “plus,” not a full license “minus.” By passing the behind-the-wheel test, teens have demonstrated that they’re ready to practice independently. The intermediate period of GDL establishes a supportive framework for them to continue to learn without the additional pressures and dangers associated with full licensure.

Upcoming Twitter Chat on Sports-Related #KidsConcussions

CIRP@CHOP's Mark Zonfrillo, MD, MSCE (@safetymd) will be an expert participant in an upcoming Twitter Chat on sports-related head injuries in children. The chat will cover a wide variety of topics including the latest concussion research, advocacy, education about how to protect young athletes, signs and symptoms of concussions, and treatment options.

Posttraumatic Stress After Pediatric Injury: What Practitioners Should Know

As a pediatric nurse, I know that the impact of injury for children and parents can sometimes go beyond the physical wound and that a full recovery can require more than the excellent medical care we now know how to provide. According to a recent research review in JAMA: Pediatrics by my colleague, Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD, a substantial body of research shows that posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms are common after pediatric injury and that these symptoms can affect a child’s physical and functional recovery. As pediatric health practitioners, we play a crucial role in recognizing and addressing PTS reactions in our injured patients.Here's what you can do.

Collaborating to Improve Car Seat Safety

Although a recent New York Times article on child restraint system misuse cautioned that car seat manufacturers and automakers do not collaborate on safety solutions, this partnership is thriving through CIRP@CHOP's Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS).

Joining with NHTSA to Kick Off National Teen Driver Safety Week

Happy National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW)! Today we are with David Strickland, the Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, at a 10 a.m. (EST) press conference at the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). The event officially kicks off a week of activities that aim to start dialogues about teen driver safety amongst families, in schools, and in communities. NTDSW is now in its seventh year.

Buyer Beware: When One Study Contradicts All the Rest

A recently published research article seemingly contradicted a body of research supporting belt-positioning booster seats as protective for children in crashes, suggesting instead a higher risk of injury to the neck and thorax for children in boosters as compared to belts alone. Upon further review, there were several methodological concerns with the study, highlighting the significance of taking a critical look at new research, particularly that which contradicts many studies before it.

Improving Outcomes for Seriously Injured Children

When we think about trauma and prevention we often focus on death as the outcome. However, functional disability from trauma is far more common than death and can cause long-term physical and cognitive impairment despite inpatient rehabilitation. In fact, 95 percent of children and young adults survive moderate to severe trauma. How can we best measure these impairments in a standardized manner? What happens to these patients when they leave the hospital and inpatient rehabilitation? Are we doing all we can to ensure these children recover to reach their fullest potential?

Helmets Prevent Concussions? Not So Fast

Although well-intentioned, helmets and playing/practice standards such as hit counts have jumped ahead of the science in concussion prevention. This and other topics are covered in release of the Institute of Medicine’s report on youth sports-related concussion, released today.

Video FAQs on Concussion: Short Videos Address Common Questions

In order to address the most common questions about pediatric concussion that CHOP concussion specialists hear from patients, parents, school and coaches, the Minds Matter team at CIRP@CHOP created eight short videos ranging in length from 1.5 to 3.5 minutes. The videos are simple, direct and provide answers in relatable terms for families.