July 2013

Minimizing Risk of Unintentional Injury For Children with Disabilities- Part One

A couple of summers ago, I awoke to the sound of the doorbell ringing at 7AM. Puzzled, I looked through the window and saw a young girl with Down syndrome standing on our front step. She said that she was lost and didn’t know where her mom was. We quickly called the police, and thankfully, her mother found us within a short period of time, explaining that her daughter had run out of the house while they were preparing for a move. Thankfully, no one was hurt during that experience, but it was a dangerous situation. With the recent buzz of excitement in my clinical practice about summer’s increased outdoor time, I thought it would be helpful to discuss why children with developmental disabilities are at higher risk of unintentional injury when the weather’s warm. And in a future post, to share prevention tools that are available.

Summer Safety a Hot Topic in Pediatric Injury Prevention

With summer now in full swing, the unique summer safety needs of children and adolescents are a prevalent topic in the media. As kids spend more time outdoors during their time off from school, we’re seeing greater emphasis on health issues like sun and swim safety in the news, advertising, and social media. Even topics like teen driver safety that receive attention throughout the year have a bit more emphasis in the summer – particularly as research shows the 10 deadliest days for teen drivers occur between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Since many safety organizations are sharing great information and resources via traditional and social media, below is a snapshot of some recent summer safety tips to consider and share.

What to Look for in a Mentor and Mentee

I didn’t recognize the importance of mentors until I was a graduate student at the University of Toledo and stumbled upon Jeanne Brockmyer, PhD, distinguished emeritus professor of Psychology. This amazing mentor helped to identify my goals (some of which I didn’t even know myself) and worked with me to develop concrete strategies to achieve those goals. My experience with this knowledgeable and caring individual led me to seek out mentors at every step of my career and to become an effective mentor myself.

Crash Data Collection: Keeping Focus on Children

Today, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is holding a public meeting to gather input on its efforts to significantly upgrade the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) for the first time since NASS’s inception in the 1970’s. NASS collects data on a nationally representative sample of police-reported motor vehicle traffic crashes and related injuries, and therefore plays a pivotal role in research, legislation, and policy. CIRP@CHOP has been working with NHTSA since 2007 to develop the National Child Occupant Special Study (NCOSS), a system for collecting supplemental child-specific data as part of NASS-GES (General Estimates System), and will continue to be vocal in ensuring the unique safety needs of children are considered as NASS is modernized.

Minimizing Risk of Unintentional Injury For Children with Disabilities- Part Two

Last week we discussed why children with developmental disabilities are at risk for unintentional injury. Today I'll share some tips and resources on keeping kids with developmental disabilities safe, especially in the summer.

Babies Have a Say On Comfort of Rear-facing Car Seats

Read a guest blog post from CHOP's Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies (CChIPS) investigator Julie Bing of The Ohio State University. Julie discusses recent CChIPS research on the comfort of children in rear-facing vs. forward-facing child restraint systems.

A Lesson in Royal Car Seat Safety

On Tuesday, July 23, the world watched as the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge introduced us to their first child, Prince George. For those of us in the child passenger safety community, the happy occasion was soon mixed with concern as the new parents strapped their son into a child safety seat and drove off. As many blogs, forums, and national news outlets have reported, it appeared that although Prince George was rear-facing he was not properly restrained in his child safety seat.

Practical Policies to Prevent Injury & Manage Acute Care

In a recent study from CIRP@CHOP, we examined the potential impact on the healthcare system associated with increases in the number of young people with health insurance. We found a potential for more than 730,000 additional medically attended injuries annually, or a 6.1 percent increase, if all currently uninsured children and young adults become insured and if these newly insured youth access medical care in ways similar to those who already have insurance.