February 2013

Blogging to Turn Research Into Action

Welcome to the Center for Injury Research and Prevention (CIRP)’s new Injury Blog! At CIRP, we recognize that to save lives and prevent injuries, we need to partner with you, the stakeholders who want to cure the epidemic of injury - community groups and non-profit organizations, government and regulatory bodies, industry, clinicians, and, most importantly interested children, teens and their families. Our scientific foundation can only make a difference when it informs the design and use of programs, policies and products and you are the change agents who make this happen. Through the Injury Blog, we hope to share important issues and scientific advances with the hope that this information will help to be useful to you, our stakeholders, and will help us work together to bring the evidence to practical solutions to address the epidemic of injury.

Digital Age of Injury Prevention Communications

For the past 12 years, I’ve worked with brilliant but humble scientists who, typically, prefer to communicate their expertise through the peer-review process of scientific journal publication. This preference has fueled our reputation as a source of reliable evidence-based information on child injury prevention. But it can cause long delays in communication of actionable advice that could save a life. This has led us to debate whether blogging and social media might help our Center share what we learn with stakeholders and fellow researchers more effectively.

Swimming the English Channel for CIRP

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to swim the English Channel? Imagine swimming 21 miles in 57-degree water with no wet suit, while negotiating tides in one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. Well, Ika Kovacikova, one of our 2012 Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) participants, is taking on the challenge and dedicating proceeds from her English Channel swim to CHOP's Violence Intervention Program.

Disabling Injuries in Children

While injury is still the leading cause of death for children older than 1 year of age, we have made great strides in reducing the number of children killed from trauma, particularly in motor vehicle crashes. This is something the injury prevention community should be proud of and continue to work toward. However, given that the overall survival rate for children with moderate to severe trauma is greater than 95 percent, it is equally as important to understand the burden of disabling injuries in children.

Driving Into the Future

Welcome to the new blog for the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia! I’m Patty Huang, a developmental and behavioral pediatrician at CHOP with an interest in the safety of children and teens with developmental disabilities, and I will be the moderator of this blog.

Asking Kids About Traumatic Stress- Our Research

As clinicians or researchers, we often turn to parents to tell us how their child is faring emotionally. Parents are THE experts on their child, and are a great source of information about changes in a child’s usual behaviors. But research and clinical experience have shown that parents may not always grasp a child’s emotional symptoms. After a scary event, it is crucial to ask children directly about their own traumatic stress reactions.