Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Children in Hot Cars: No Single Solution to These Preventable Tragedies

This blog explores how a multi-faceted approach is needed to reduce the prevalence of pediatric heat stroke. A combination of education, awareness, and technology can help families avoid these preventable tragedies.

Harnessing the Tools of Marketers for Prevention Science

Think about the last time you had a good online shopping experience.You probably felt like it was personal, pleasant, and quickly met your needs. Right? Well, behind such an experience is a very sophisticated process that involves user-centered design and testing, user tracking, evaluation, continuous improvement, and an eye towards creating a personal encounter and a loyal customer. Learn how CIRP@CHOP is using these marketing tools to deliver an online program to teach teens how to drive.

Early Intervention After Child Trauma: Do We Know What Works?

When traumatic events affect children we all want to help. In the aftermath of large-scale tragedies, communities are often deluged with donations and offers of assistance, not all of them useful. How to help in a way that is useful and supportive of children’s natural recovery processes is a pressing issue in the field of traumatic stress. Dr. Kassam-Adams proposes a guide to researchers and practitioners to meet the challenge.

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