Research in Action Blog

The world of child injury prevention advances quickly in big and small steps each day. The Research in Action blog shares credible and timely commentary on the latest news, research, events, and more as we work together to keep children safe. We invite thought-provoking comments to spur friendly conversation among our readers. We feel that the regular posting of well-informed commentary by our readers will only enhance the quality of our blog. Comments are moderated by the Research in Action blog staff. The comments section is not intended to be a forum for specific parenting advice or to promote a product. Please use the "Contact Us" form for any information requests. Read more about our Commenting Guidelines.

Airplane Safety Restraint for Kids with Special Needs

What if my patient doesn't need an adaptive car seat but has behavioral challenges and the parents feel that the traditional airplane seat belt may not be effective enough to keep him restrained? The CARES restraint is approved for airplane use for children 22-40 lbs and up 40 inches tall. If a child exceeds the weight limit but the parents feel that this is still a better option for restraint, they can apply for an exemption from the FAA.

Study of Top Five Teen Driver Crash Scenarios

How and why do teen drivers crash? This is such an important question for teens and parents, as well as researchers, automakers, and other road users, including other vehicles, bicyclists, and pedestrians. By better understanding teen driver crashes, we can design effective strategies to prevent them. Dr. Allison Curry and I co-led a study on teen driver serious crashes and our findings, recently published in Accident Analysis and Prevention, detail the scenarios in which teen drivers most often crash and compared them to adult drivers.

Reach Diverse Populations Across GDL Continuum: How to Connect Researchers, Stakeholders, and Programs?

How can we better connect to improve road traffic safety with a focus on how teens learn to drive? Researchers and traffic safety practitioners all want youth to grow to their full potential. Doing so will require joining proven effective skill-building and risk-reduction interventions across the Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) continuum and making them broadly accessible through programs for diverse populations.

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